Reviews for Astéronymes

"Claire Trévien's work is truly beautiful, the collection's idiosyncrasies and inventiveness kept me intrigued, amused and hungry for more. I enjoyed her playfulness and also her subtle ways of bringing home serious messages about the human condition, both the good and the bad."
Haley Jenkins, Selcouth Station, May 2017
"Astéronymes zooms out to a broader historical perspective. Broader to the point of vertigo: the book’s sense of geological time is profoundly unsettling, with sea and stones obeying a rhythm too slow for our fleeting minds to register, each confrontation producing a startling short-circuit of language and imagery"
Gareth Prior, February 2017
"Trévien’s words are at times humorous and crass, and other mournful and waning, serving as an elegy to destruction and neglect throughout time."
Arabella Fawley, Jade the Obscure, January 2017
"In Astéronymes, Claire Trévien has set up camp at that point where geology becomes history"

Julia Bird, Poetry London, Autumn 2016

"It is a brilliant collection, and the oddities and idiosyncrasies that make it worth reading are beautifully framed and presented. Claire Trévien has dropped her reader into a menagerie full of shifting, self-determined poetry and it certainly merits revisiting.."

Daniel Etches, Oxford Student, August 2016

"Like the title, this is a collection that holds back, but contains more than it seems, and it takes a confident approach to the malleability of poetic expression"

Alex Pryce, Mslexia, Summer 2016

"The intriguing and magical world of Claire Trévien’s poems has a playfulness about it as the stone circles of Britain, Ireland, and Brittany appear in company with the language of the internet."

Ian Brinton, Tears in the Fence, August 2016 

"It’s easy to get lost, pleasantly so, in the delights of Trévien’s skilful word-play, but beyond this linguistic nimbling, the poems speak for themselves – connecting to something less cerebral and far more immediate."

Judy Darley, Skylightrain, 31st May 2016

"Five years on, Trévien’s brave new collection is now characterized by the maturity of absence, not abundance. Each delicate, almost fleeting poem revels in the poet’s sensitive eye for spaces seen and remembered. A poet is revealed who has, in the interim, honed the rare art of the unsaid. [...] While even a book of absences must omit some others, Trévien points us circumspectly towards the forgotten and deleted histories beyond her reach. Her words have left us wiser, and more observant, to trace their contours on our own.

Theophilus Kwek, The Oxford Culture Review, 18 April 2016

"This is poetry red in tooth and claw (and wine), poetry for readers who aren't afraid to be kicked in the groin between moments of beauty and insight. [...] We should all look forward to where Trévien takes us next with her 'language defined / by joints forced into new frontiers.'

Humphrey Astley, Oxford Mail, 11 April 2016

"Toying with language and sound, these poems are replete with elliptical meanings which resound in a barren landscape where "only our objects remains" [...] Trévien depicts a world in which the ancient and the digital mingle in unsettling yet fruitful combinations.

PBS Bulletin, March 2016

Reviews for The Shipwrecked House

"Trévien’s love of, and adeptness for, language saturates the text throughout. The imagery is arresting, bringing to mind the wildest, wickedest kinds of fairy tales [...] You’ll emerge from the pages feeling like you’ve just returned from an exhausting yet exhilarating visit to the strangest seaside you’ve ever encountered.

JUDY DARLEY, SKYLIGHTRAIN, 01/04/2014

"It is the debris for which we yearn [...] a fantastic poetry collection..." ****

RODOLFO BARRADAS, THE STUDENT JOURNAL, 20/03/2014

"Images play on each other with a sense of decay and time passing. Isn’t all homesickness not for a place but for a past?"

DAVID MILLS, THE SUNDAY TIMES , 12/01/2014

"....a pick and mix collection salvaged from various styles: the very best of a wreckage....This maritime collection has arrived from Trévien as such: a fleet of poems that collide and depart from one another in unexpected ways..."

EVE LACEY, FOR BOOKS' SAKE , 24/09/2013

"The detritus of what once was abounds in the myths and broken forms of The Shipwrecked House … hoisted into the sharp relief of post-millennial modernity."

EDWARD DOEGAR, POETRY LONDON , AUTUMN 2013

"Rich in imagery, musicality and wit – surreal maritime visions that sing of myth and magic"

TARA WHEELER, ANNEXE MAGAZINE5/11/2013

"...Trévien’s surrealism is haunting – it’s beautiful and sometimes terrifying and often humorous. You can hear the waves crashing through the pages, feel the pebbles underfoot, and smell the salt of seaweed. The sea runs through the book like a well-loved friend, even when behind closed doors."

FRAN ROBERTS, HOUSE OF BLOG , 20/10/2013

"Trévien’s is a beguilingly original voice and this is an assured first collection, startling and strangely beautiful (and perfect for an impulse holiday read).."

GARETH PRIOR, 22/07/2013

Reviews for Low-Tide Lottery

"These poems are alive and not to be missed. "

HELENA NELSON, SPHINX, 12/02/2012

"Though Trévien plays with form there is never any danger of experiment for experiment’s sake

BEN PARKER, BOOK NUDGE, 16/11/2011

"Trévien’s grimy tactility, her eye for a sharp detail, & her ability to raise the significance of an individual object through memory & myth, all comes from this, just as one pulls strange & incongruous objects from the sand & out of a tangle of rotting seaweed."

CHARLES WHALLEY, 15/10/2011

"Trevien’s work comes as a breath of fresh air, a sea change from a lot of contemporary poetry which sees itself as a vehicle for interesting or odd imagery with nothing underneath it. Trevien’s work is laden with accomplished images, but behind it is wealth of personal, historical, literary and linguistic detail which elevates the work and makes the pamphlet well worth reading. "

IAN MCMILLAN, INK, SWEAT AND TEARS, 12/10/2011

"The most effective lyric has an anarchic streak. Trévien never loses sight of that in her observations, which are often poetically sharp and darkly humorous."

MARKIE BURNHOPE, PEONY MOON, 28/09/2011

© 2019 by CLAIRE TREVIEN. 

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